STANDARD Film Developer

Q: Can the film developer be used in a replenishment system?

Samuel Thompson : July 9, 2013 9:05 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

Can the film developer be used as replenishment?

 

Yes, it is possible to use our STANDARD Film Developer in a replenishment system. Please follow the instructions outlined on the product information page on our website. 

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Q: Why are there are spots on my negatives?

Samuel Thompson : July 9, 2013 9:04 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

Why are there are spots on my negatives?

 

Spots can appear on your negatives for many reasons. Particlews in the processing or wash water are a common cause of black spots on negatives.  Old processing solutions that have thrown a precipitate are another. Clear spots (with no damage to the emulsion) are often caused by dust on the film in the camera. Clear spots may also be caused by physical damage.  

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Q: How do I make a working solution with STANDARD Film Developer?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 8:09 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

Sprint STANDARD Film Developer is sold in concentrate form. To prepare a working solution, mix one part concentrate with nine parts water (1:9). A few films (denoted by an asterisk on our chart) have been found to develop better in a solution of two parts concentrate to 8 parts water (2:8).

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Q: What should I do if my film is not listed on your product labeling or Standard B & W Film Developer Time Chart?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 8:09 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

While Sprint tests most films commonly available in North America, there will unavoidably be some for which we have no recommendations. The Digital Truth website’s Massive Development Time Chart may suggest some useful starting points… but nothing is as good as doing your own tests, in your own conditions.  This site contains development times for a wide range of films and photochemistry and can be used to provide further insight into the development time for your particular film.

Individual testing and experimentation is also suggested for those who wish to develop personal style and technique. If you would like to suggest a film type for us to test, please use the contact form on our site to send us an email. Although we cannot guarantee testing of all films, we will attempt to provide information as it becomes available.

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Q: How do I find the development time for my film?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 8:08 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

Consult the STANDARD Black & White Film Developer Time Chart.

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Q: Can I “push process” my film with Sprint™ STANDARD Film Developer?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 8:07 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

Yes, underexposed  film can be “push processed” with STANDARD. Our recommendation is to add two chart letters for one stop of underexposure, and four chart letters for two stops. For example, Ilford HP5+, whose normal chart letter is “O” (10 minutes at 20° C or 68° F), would be moved up by at least two chart letters, to “Q” (13 minutes at 20° C or 68° F), if it were underexposed by 1 stop.

Please note that Sprint™ STANDARD B & W Film Developer is designed for optimum quality at a film’s normal exposure recommendation. While underexposed film may be developed in STANDARD, the film’s contrast will increase and its tonal range will be restricted. Developing film underexposed by more than two stops with STANDARD is unrealistic and not recommended. With experience, you are likely to find that underexposure and push processing are best avoided…

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Q: How much developer do I need?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 8:07 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

One liter of STANDARD concentrate will make 10 liters of working solution, capable of developing at least (50) rolls of 35mm 36 exposure film (4,000 square inches), or enough replenished solution to develop 110 rolls

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Q: I shot my film at a lower ISO. How do I develop it?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 8:06 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

For one stop (i.e. 400 film @ 200) use the normal time (you may prefer the results from this); for two stops (i.e. 400 @ 100) subtract one chart letter from the normal recommendation.

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Q: My film has different development times with Sprint™ STANDARD Film Developer and Kodak D 76. Aren’t they the same?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 7:57 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

No, they are not the same and have different ingredients. That said, some suggested development times will be similar, and both could be characterized as “general purpose” developers.

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Q: Can I process B&W slides with Sprint™ Developer?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 7:57 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

Sprint™ Systems no longer supplies products for reversal processing.

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Q: Can I develop Litho film in Sprint™ Developer?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 7:56 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

Litho film was intended to give only black and clear, with no mid-tones, when developed in litho developer. If this is what you need, there are probably litho developers still on the market.

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Q: Can I use Sprint™ Developer with another company’s fixer?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 7:56 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

While Sprint™ products are specifically designed as a system, they can be used with other manufacturers’  products. For example, one can use Sprint™ developer, Kodak stop bath, and Ilford fixer. One exception to this is Alum Hardening Converter. We do not recommend that Sprint™ RECORD Alum Hardening Converter be mixed with other manufacturers’ fixers.

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Q: Can I use Sprint™ STANDARD Film Developer to develop prints?

Samuel Thompson : November 14, 2011 7:52 pm : FAQs, STANDARD FILM DEVELOPER

You probably don’t want to do this… In a print, you usually want some good, solid, maximum black. Most print developers are designed to be energetic enough to give this in a couple of minutes, as long as you expose the paper correctly. By contrast, when developing film, you want to avoid maximum black as this makes a negative that is very hard to print. So film developers are much less energetic than film developers, and when used with paper, give weak, muddy, prints. if you have to, maybe try doubling the concentration… raising the temperature… agitating continuously and vigorously.

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