QUICK SILVER Print Developer

$15.81$162.53

QUICK SILVER gives B&W print tones a distinctive neutral color which does not vary from highlight to shadow nor with development time (unlike metol-hydroquinone solutions). QUICK SILVER gives warm-tone papers a more neutral color than other developers.

One liter of QUICK SILVER concentrate makes 10 liters of working solution.

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SKU: PR000_W Category:

Description

Using QUICK SILVER Print Developer

The developing agent in QUICK SILVER is pyrazolidone-hydroquinone, which gives very good control of print density, keeping contrast and color constant.

Color

QUICK SILVER gives B&W print tones a distinctive neutral color which does not vary from highlight to shadow, nor with development time (unlike metol-hydroquinone solutions). QUICK SILVER gives warm-tone papers a more neutral color than other developers.

Contrast & Density

QUICK SILVER develops all image tones at a constant rate. Therefore overall print density increases with development, but contrast ( the relative difference between highlight and shadow density) does not vary. Overall density may be controlled by exposure and/or development. Color and contrast are determined only by the type of paper and grade of filtration.

Directions on this label are for processing B&W prints with QUICK SILVER and two other SPRINT™ concentrates. Mix working solution in any volume by diluting 1:9 with water. One liter of QUICK SILVE concentrate will make 10 liters of working solution, enough to process (600) 8×10 fiber prints or (900) 8×10 resin-coated prints.

Procedures for Producing B&W Prints

StepProcedureTiming
1QUICK SILVER Print Developer30 sec - 3 min (See Exposure & Development)
2BLOCK Stop Bath5 Seconds
3RECORD Speed Fixer1-3 minute(s)
4Water Wash10 Minutes

Agitate continuously in all steps. For maximum shadow density, move prints at least 2-3 inches per second through developer.

Drain for 5 seconds between each step. Note: When draining prints, wait until solution draining off the print has changed from a stream into a series of drops. This procedure will prevent excess solution from entering the other baths and accelerating exhaustion.

Solutions may be used at any temperature between 18-30°C / 64.5-86°F.

How to Mix

Standard Dilution

Dilute QUICK SILVER concentrate 1:9 with water to make the desired volume of working solution.

100mlQUICK SILVER B&W Print Developer Concentrate
+900ml Water
=1000mlQUICK SILVER B&W Print Developer Working Solution

Alternate Dilution

Dilute QUICK SILVER concentrate 1:19 to make a weaker working solution, which is economical when printing in large trays or whenever the full capacity of a 1:9 solution cannot be used. This dilution has a slower activity, which is useful when exposure or development of prints cannot be limited enough to reduce excess density. Minimum times for a 1:19 working solution are approximately 30 seconds longer than in the 1:9 working solution. The capacity and shelf life of 1:19 solution are one-half that of the 1:9 solution.

50mlQUICK SILVER B&W Print Developer Concentrate
+950ml Water
=1000mlQUICK SILVER B&W Print Developer Working Solution

Water Washes

Minimum water wash time for commercial purposes is 10 minutes for fiber-based prints, and 3 minutes for RC prints.

For thorough washing to archival specifications, please refer to the Archival Procedures described in the instructions for using ARCHIVE Fixer Remover.

Exposure & Development

Once immersed in QUICK SILVER, most RC prints will develop to their final contrast and color characteristics within 30-60 seconds, and then continue to increase in overall density only.

Most Fiber prints will develop to their final contrast and color characteristics within a range of 1:30 – 3:00 minutes and then continue to increase in overall density only.

With five times the minimum development time, density will increase by approximately 1 full stop in fiber prints or 1/3 stop in resin-coated papers. Development may continue past this point but the density increase will be slight and safelights may fog prints. Development for less than the minimum time will result in flat, uneven density.

Prints which need very long development to reach desired density are underexposed. If you can, try again, adding exposure so that the print develops to the desired density within 1-4 minutes, at any temperature 18-25°C / 64.5-77°F.

 

Additional information

Weight N/A
Dimensions N/A

Capacity & Exhaustion

Capacity

One Liter of QUICK SILVER Print Developer 1:9 working solution will process at least (60) 8×10 fiber prints or (90) 8×10 resin-coated prints.

Tray Life

Deeper solution has a longer tray life. After 12 hours per inch depth of working solution, QUICK SILVER’s activity slows to double the Minimum Development Time, but contrast and color activity remain the same within capacity.

Exhaustion Indicator

When using QUICK SILVER Print Developer, BLOCK Stop Bath and RECORD Speed Fixer mixed in equal volumes, the lavender color of BLOCK will signal the simultaneous exhaustion of all three solutions.

Shelf Life

Shelf Life

Stored away from strong light, at a temperature of 25°C / 77°F or lower, QUICK SILVER has the following shelf life:

ConcentrateMinimum Shelf Life
Unopened container12 months
Opened container (air free)6 months
Opened container (25% air)3 months
Working SolutionMinimum Shelf Life
Unused, full container1 month
Used, full container1 week
Used, 25% air72 hours

Storage for longer times or under less favorable conditions will reduce working solution capacity by 50% or more.

FAQs

Can I alter the developer mixture to control the contrast of a print?

Yes, to a limited extent – much less than is the case with film.

Do I have to use Stop Bath?

No but, stop bath is cheap and avoids problems from developer carrying over into fixer. Staining and reticulation are prevented, and the life of the (more expensive) fixer is extended.

How much developer do I need?

One liter of QUICK SILVER concentrate will make 10 liters of working solution, capable of processing (600) 8×10 fiber prints or (900) 8×10 resin-coated prints.

Can I use Sprint™ STANDARD Film Developer to develop prints?

You probably don’t want to do this… In a print, you usually want some good, solid, maximum black. Most print developers are designed to be energetic enough to give this in a couple of minutes, as long as you expose the paper correctly. By contrast, when developing film, you want to avoid maximum black as this makes a negative that is very hard to print. So film developers are much less energetic than film developers, and when used with paper, give weak, muddy, prints. if you have to, maybe try doubling the concentration… raising the temperature… agitating continuously and vigorously.